Fire Permits

Fire Permits?
If you are in the rural surrounds of Muriwai and wish to light a fire you need to contact Auckland Council directly for a permit, please phone 09 301 0101. The brigade does not issue permits.

To obtain a permit please click here.

If you light a fire without a permit, you breach the terms of your permit, or fail to control a fire you have lit, you could be legally liable for costs associated with putting it out.

Where are fires Banned?
You are not allowed to light fires in the following areas;
  • In Muriwai urban township (see further information below).
You are also not allowed to burn anything except vegetation in rural areas (when a fire is permitted or allowed) fires containing rubbish, building materials, plastics, or anything that is not vegetation, will be extinguished by the Fire Brigade.

If you see smoke in any of the areas listed above call 111 immediately.

Fires in Muriwai Township?
If you live in Muriwai township - the area inside Oaia, Motutara and Waitea Roads, then you are not allowed to like a fire. See information below.

Backyard fires

Outdoor burning and the use of single chamber incinerators are a major source of pollution in the Auckland region. When materials are burnt in the open or in backyard incinerators the fire is not hot enough, and does not have sufficient oxygen, to destroy air pollutants.

As well as producing harmful pollutants, open fires and fires in unapproved incinerators can at best be a real nuisance to neighbours (odour, smoke, ash, and soiling of surfaces). At worst they are dangerous to property and people.

Auckland Council rules mean that the outdoor burning of rubbish and garden waste in urban areas is an offence, even if it is in an incinerator.

Outdoor cooking and heating
Outdoor fires for heating or cooking like hangis or brazier fires are allowed, but must be in conditions where any smoke, ash or other discharge to air is not a nuisance to neighbours or noxious. These fires can generally be burned without further permission with the exception of hangis and umus on Waiheke or Great Barrier islands. You will need a permit in these areas, these are issued free of charge. Contact Auckland Council for more information.

You do not require permission for a hangi or umu within the Auckland isthmus.

To ensure that everyone can enjoy a safe summer we recommend that you have a garden hose handy in case of emergencies keep matches and lighters out of children's reach develop and practise household escape plans with your family or flatmates isolate flammable liquids let your neighbours know if you're having a hangi, umu or barbeque be cautious with candles and mosquito coils do not throw cigarette butts or matches into vegetation use dry wood and paper only for lighting the fire - rubbish is not acceptable have the Hangi or Umu at least three metres from any boundary or building to minimise smoke nuisance and decrease fire risk

To help make your hangi or umu a success you will also need to consider the following part 3.6 of Auckland City's Consolidated Bylaw requires that no animals used for the hangi, umu or barbeque be killed or gutted on site remove rubbish from the site immediately afterwards and dispose of it carefully. 

Store leftover food scraps in a container/bin with a cover until rubbish day.

Do not bury meat or vegetable scraps as this could attract rats and dogs both of which carry infectious diseases.

Rural, Commercial and industrial fires
Fires on farms in rural areas (when allowed) must ONLY be for the disposal of vegetation, NOT household or commercial rubbish, treated timber, building materials etc.

Contact Auckland Council for information about burning rubbish on industrial or commercial sites eg what can be burnt and how.The fine for an illegal fire for trade or industrial premise is $1000.00. Fines can be issued by Auckland Council.

Fires in public places
It is illegal to have a fire in any public place in Auckland City, including beaches, parks, reserves and forests. This rule also applies to the Hauraki Gulf islands where people often mistakenly believe fires are safe.